Known as Les Vendeuses, they and the coffee shop Cafe Rose Nicaud on Frenchmen Street are Nicaud's legacy.Community Book Center is the only Black-owned bookstore in New Orleans and features Afrocentric art, clothing and books. Come for the soul-food buffett and dine on the history in these storied walls.There would be no New Orleans without hundreds of years of unpaid labor it gained from enslaving people of African descent. February marks the national commemoration of Black History Month, but in New Orleans, African-American contributions to the city’s multilayered culture are observed daily.

But hurry to visit Studio Be; the exhibit will be closing by the summer. In celebration of the 300th anniversary, he's been commissioned to paint new murals that showcase local history.

Portraits of the Virgin Mary and Jesus are painted in the image of local models in the very Catholic town, helping New Orleanians to see the image of God in themselves. If you don't make it in time, you can see Bmike's artwork on walls throughout the city. (@Shawn Fink) Sign-up and receive travel ideas directly to your inbox.

The wide-open space is the site of concerts, weddings, festivals and historical celebrations. Saint Augustine Catholic Church in Tremé is the oldest Black parish in … The nice bus " The Black Pearl " takes us deeper into the heart & Soul of New Orleans. Here, you can learn about Indigenous Mardi Gras traditions, second-line parades and jazz funerals. The muralist uses spray paint to depict civil rights icons like Fannie Lou Hammer and Muhammad Ali and elevates New Orleans locals to icon-status. This Black History Month, there's no better time to visit New Orleans.The Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans is the oldest Black neighborhood in America.

Saint Augustine Church. Click on a picture to enjoy more inspiring photos and stories.Click on a picture to enjoy more inspiring photos and stories.Click on a picture to enjoy more inspiring photos and stories.This website uses cookies to personalize content and ads and to analyze traffic.

Though the hometown of Mardi Gras is known for its one-of-a-kind food and fun celebrations, it's also rich with culture and history.Scroll through these photographs to see the oldest African American neighborhood in the country, learn the story of the first coffee seller in New Orleans and meet the people who are shaping the city today. Bmike's murals also depict modern social justice movements, highlighting police brutality and mass incarceration.

As the celebrating began, I visited my favorite American city.

Every time a New Orleanian dances the bamboula to a second-line beat, they're celebrating our shared black history. Saint Augustine Catholic Church in Tremé is the oldest Black parish in America. These musical celebrations were opportunities for enslaved people to reinforce their African culture and traditions, many of which live on in celebrations held at the Square today.Leah and her husband Dooky Chase turned a New Orleans staple po' boy sandwich shop into a thriving sit-down restaurant that's been in business since 1946.Though Dooky passed away a few years ago, Leah, the restaurant's executive chef still runs the show of this iconic soul food restaurant. Founded in 1841, both free and enslaved Black people worshipped at Saint Augustine's. February marks the national commemoration of Black History Month, but in New Orleans, African-American contributions to the city’s multilayered culture are observed daily.

From Congo Square to the Mayor's Office, there is much to learn about one of the most vibrant cities in America.

Owned by Vera Williams, CBC has been living up to its name for more than 30 years, with its array of events that bring New Orleanians together to discuss Black history and culture. New Orleans is a gumbo of historic influences, a spicy mash up of cultures that range from Native American and African to Cuban, French, Spanish, Sicilian and Irish and more. By closing this banner or continuing to browse this website, you agree to the use of cookies. Located in Tremé, this museum has the most comprehensive collection of African American New Orleanians' processional traditions in the world. Bring your shopping!! Throughout 2018, New Orleans will be celebrating its 300th anniversary. Of course, there are historical tours about the devastating realities of slavery and resistance, on which …

Mayor-elect Cantrell will be inaugurated in May, but Cantrell is always out and about in the city. Check out the beautiful Mid-City campuses of After dinner, burn off a few calories by shaking it to the African-style beats of the Grammy-winning Rebirth Brass Band during their Tuesday-night blowouts at the A salute to the Crescent City's African-American ancestry. Dive into the culture of Crescent City with a history tour. Fascinating for adults and children alike, the studio features a Young Artists in Residence corner where Bmike's paintings are printed in black and white for students to color and hang on the wall these powerful images. Here she is at Dooky Chase's Restaurant with 95-year-old executive chef Leah Chase.Visual artist Brandan "Bmike" Odums opened his first solo exhibit, Studio Be just two years ago. From okra-accented gumbo to vibrant second-line parades, black history is at the soul of the Crescent City.

In addition to its wide array of Indigenous Mardi Gras costumes and cultural artifacts, Backstreet also hosts community events and public performances and collaborates with institutions during big annual celebrations like Essence Fest and Jazz Fest. From museums and restaurants to theaters and churches, Tremé offers countless opportunities to get outside of the famed French Quarter and dive into this neighborhood's significant Black history and culture. There are tours about the origins of jazz and where you can experience it now. Over the years, Leah would dedicate the restaurant's walls to showcasing Black artists' work when galleries turned them away. Black-owned tours will take you through stories of music, history, food, slavery, and the Civil Rights Movement in New Orleans. Because of her resourcefulness, many other Black women became entrepreneurs following her example.

Fearing insurrections by the enslaved people, enslavers and other city leaders did not want Black people to be able to congregate in private.